The Daily Parker

Politics, Weather, Photography, and the Dog

Go Tammy!

Congressional candidate Tammy Duckworth (D, IL-06) is on WBEZ-Chicago's 848 right now, wiping the floor with her right-wing opponent, Peter Roskam. Tune in if you aren't already listening.

"Well, Peter, I've been to Iraq, where I had steak and lobster every night but I didn't have armor on the truck I drove that carried 5,000 gallons of aviation fuel."

Update: The show is available for download (.mp3, 26.2 MB).

Disclosure: I have contributed money to the Duckworth campaign.

Want a better Congress?

Here are three ways to help, right in TDP's back yard. You can contribute a few bucks to Melissa Bean, running for re-election to Congress from Illinois' 8th district, to Tammy Duckworth, running for Henry Hyde's seat in the Illinois 6th, or to Dan Seals in the Illinois 10th.

Duckworth is currently polling within the margin of error against her opponent, Peter Roskam, who continually sinks to new depths in his desperate campaign to keep the seat in Greedy Old Party hands. The GOP has just given almost half a million dollars to Roskam, all for negative ads attacking Duckworth. So her campaign might need a little more than the other two right now.

Update: Duckworth picked up the Chicago Tribune's endorsement today. The Tribune generally leans right of center, in much the same way that Ronald Reagan did; so their endorsement is notable.

Disclosure: I have contributed money to all three campaigns mentioned in this post, and I plan to volunteer for Duckworth on election day (19 days, 4 hours).

Cook County, Illinois, judge guide for voters

The Chicago Bar Association has released its recommendations for judicial retentions in the upcoming elections. Illinois voters have the opportunity to reject judges each year. A judge needs to get 60% yes votes to keep his or her seat, and every year, the CBA and other organizations recommend that a few not be retained. This year's losers include:

CYNTHIA BRIM - NOT RECOMMENDED

The candidate declined to participate in the Judicial Evaluation Committee (JEC) screening process and, therefore, according to The Chicago Bar Association's governing resolution for the JEC, is automatically found NOT RECOMMENDED.

BARBARA J. DISKO - NOT RECOMMENDED

The candidate declined to participate in the Judicial Evaluation Committee (JEC) screening process and, therefore, according to The Chicago Bar Association's governing resolution for the JEC, is automatically found NOT RECOMMENDED.

LORETTA EADIE-DANIELS - NOT RECOMMENDED

Judge Loretta Eadie-Daniels is not recommended for retention as a Circuit Court Judge. Judge Eadie-Daniels was admitted to practice law in Illinois in 1977 and has served as a judge since 2000. Judge Eadie-Daniels enjoys the respect of those who appear before her for her integrity. However, it is the considered view of the Committee that Judge Eadie-Daniels does not possess the necessary depth and breadth of legal knowledge to serve as a Circuit Court Judge.

DONNA PHELPS FELTON - NOT RECOMMENDED

The candidate declined to participate in the Judicial Evaluation Committee (JEC) screening process and, therefore, according to The Chicago Bar Association's governing resolution for the JEC, is automatically found NOT RECOMMENDED.

MARCELLA CARMEN LIPINSKI - NOT RECOMMENDED

Judge Marcella C. Lipinski is not recommended for retention as a Circuit Court Judge. Judge Lipinski was admitted to practice law in Illinois in 1980 and has served as a judge since 2000. Judge Lipinski does not possess the necessary temperament and demeanor to serve as a Circuit Court Judge.

P. SCOTT NEVILLE, JR. - NOT RECOMMENDED

The candidate declined to participate in the Judicial Evaluation Committee (JEC) screening process and, therefore, according to The Chicago Bar Association's governing resolution for the JEC, is automatically found NOT RECOMMENDED.

AMANDA S. TONEY - NOT RECOMMENDED

Judge Amanda S. Toney is not recommended for retention as a Circuit Court Judge. Judge Toney was admitted to practice law in Illinois in 1985 and has served as a judge since 1994. Judge Toney needs to improve her punctuality and diligence in managing her courtroom call. Many cases assigned to her sit for much too long a period without disposition.

PAMELA E. HILL VEAL (D) - NOT RECOMMENDED

The candidate declined to participate in the Judicial Evaluation Committee (JEC) screening process and, therefore, according to The Chicago Bar Association's governing resolution for the JEC, is automatically found NOT RECOMMENDED.

GLORIA CHEVERE (D) - NOT RECOMMENDED

The candidate declined to participate in the Judicial Evaluation Committee (JEC) screening process and, therefore, according to The Chicago Bar Association's governing resolution for the JEC, is automatically found NOT RECOMMENDED.

ELLEN L. FLANNIGAN (D) - NOT RECOMMENDED

Ellen L. Flannigan is not recommended for the office of Circuit Court Judge. Ms. Flannigan was admitted to practice law in Illinois in 1988. While Ms. Flannigan is well respected for her integrity and diligence, she does not possess the breadth and depth of experience to serve as a Circuit Court Judge.

JILL C. MARISIE (R) - NOT RECOMMENDED

Jill C. Marisie is not recommended for the office of Circuit Court Judge. Ms. Marisie was admitted to practice law in Illinois in 1990. While the candidate has a fine demeanor, she lacks the requisite depth and breadth of legal experience to serve as a Circuit Court Judge.

DANIEL PATRICK BRENNAN (D)- NOT RECOMMENDED

The candidate declined to participate in the Judicial Evaluation Committee (JEC) screening process and, therefore, according to The Chicago Bar Association's governing resolution for the JEC, is automatically found NOT RECOMMENDED.

Cubs finish season at the bottom

The Cubs did, in fact, win yesterday, but so did the Pirates, which ensured the Cubs would end at the bottom of the National League with 96 losses. That's one shy of the number of seasons the Cubs have played since their last World Series win in 1908. Management hasn't yet fired Dusty Baker—that should come this afternoon—but I believe this was his last trip back from the mound as Cubs manager:

But this is always a gratifying sight, even if it really didn't matter much:

And hey, they did win a game in October. That doesn't happen very often.

Until next year, I guess.

Going to Wrigley

A friend of mine who works for Tribune Co. invited me to today's Cubs game.

It's going to be pretty intense. The Cubs have fought valiantly since mid-May for their rightful place in the National League Central division, and it all hangs on today's results. At this moment the Cubs are where they want to be. But if the Cubs can pull it out today, and if the Pirates lose, then the Cubs will have failed to win the bottom slot in the league.

Yes, seeing that big "E" next to the Cubs' entry for the past two months has really made baseball come alive in Chicago, but you have to admit: 96 losses in a season is impressive. Not as impressive as the Royals' clean century, but still impressive. Today could be loss #97, which is only one fewer than the number of years since they last won the World Series.

I'll have photos of the game, and another Daily Parker, tomorrow.

It's hard to support incompetence

I believe strongly that slowing climate change and providing broad-based economic opportunity must include substantial improvements in public transportation. I also belive that Chicago's public transit system ranks second in the country for its reach and convenience, after New York's but ahead of San Francisco, Boston, and Washington, which are also pretty good.

That said, the CTA still frustrates the ever-lovin' out of me. This week provides a crystal-clear example.

On Tuesday and again on Thursday, I had to travel from my office to a client's office in Lincoln Park. Their office is within 1 km (0.6 mi) of four El stops, two of which are served by three transit lines. In the rush periods, one of those lines—the Purple Line—goes directly from their closest El stop to mine. So during rush periods, the trip takes about 40 minutes door to door.

Outside of rush periods, however, I need to change trains twice. Or, in the alternative, I can change trains once and then catch a bus at Howard. In fact on Tuesday I did just that, because I was going home to let Parker out instead of returning to my office. As a consequence of the CTA's horrible mid-day schedules and a broken-down bus (not to mention the CTA's complete refusal or inability to provide any information about this), I spent more than three hours riding on or waiting for CTA vehicles.

Yesterday I drove to their office, which required spending a total of 50 minutes in my own car, choosing my own route, listening to my own radio station.

By the way, as a client-serving professional, I get paid by the hour. That means, had I driven on Tuesday, I could have billed two more hours for the day. Given that calculus, why on earth would I ever take the CTA during the middle of the day again?

Now, I own a car, so this was merely a bad choice and an inconvenience on my part. But for the hundreds of thousands in Chicago who don't own cars, or who live outside the CTA's service area, it's not a choice. How much economic opportunity is lost every day because people have to spend time waiting for buses and trains? How much is lost to people who live in the suburbs where buses run once an hour and trains only go downtown?

Later: Why insecure, incompetent, and authoritarian almost always go together. And yes, it's related to this post.